Disparities in Enrollment, Funding, and Advanced Degree Patterns between Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs): A Replication Study

Phyllis a Danner, Tennessee State University

Abstract

As noted in the national publication regarding the Value of HBCUs (Cotton, 2018), "Historically black colleges and universities have made a lasting global imprint on virtually every facet of culture and society. HBCU alumni have ascended to leadership positions in government, education, business and industry, science and technology, medicine, literature, entertainment, and every other imaginable profession and vocation. The rich heritage of these institutions is a testimony to their resilience and unremitting commitment to providing access to higher education for African-Americans and others seeking empowerment and expanding their opportunities with a college degree" (p. 1). However, there continue to be disparities in state support to Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) in comparison to Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). This study replicated research conducted by Minor in 2008 and Boland and Gasman in 2014. This study intends to assist all stakeholders in first recognizing the continuous disparities concerning enrollment, funding, and advanced degree patterns compared to their PWI counterparts. Findings will contribute to the field of knowledge in the area of inequities in state funding of HBCUs. Furthermore, the study will make recommendations to correct funding disparities and provide the necessary support for equity. The research has found no statistically significant difference in Black students' enrollment and state funding at public PWIs in the combined four states in the previous study compared to the current study. Consequently, the research revealed a statistically significant decrease in the enrollment of Black students and funding at public HBCUs in the combined four states in the previous study compared to the current study. The current study also affirmed a statistically significant increase in advanced degree distribution in PWIs in the combined four states in the previous study compared to the current study and no statistically significant difference in HBCUs.

Subject Area

Educational leadership|Higher Education Administration|Education finance

Recommended Citation

Phyllis a Danner, "Disparities in Enrollment, Funding, and Advanced Degree Patterns between Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs): A Replication Study" (2020). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI28153290.
https://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI28153290

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