The Effects of Symptomology, Race and Psychological Mindedness on Attitudes toward Persons with Schizophrenia

Derron K.G Ambrose, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Persons with mental illness often encounter stigma from people, but persons with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, are most likely to be stigmatized (Dinos, Stevens, Serfaty, Weich & King, 2004). The purpose of this dissertation research project was to explore the effects of symptomology (hallucinations, delusions and disorganized speech), race, and psychological mindedness on attitudes toward persons with schizophrenia. Through this quasi-experimental design, 80 participants were randomly assigned to read a vignette that portrayed a White or Black person with schizophrenia who presented with more prominent hallucinations or delusions or disorganized speech. Participants’ attitudes toward this patient, as well as their level of psychological mindedness were explored. Analysis of Covariance was used to analyze the data. Initial analyses yielded no significant main or interaction effects; however, item analysis of the instrument measuring attitudes yielded significant interaction effects. Results showed that participants felt more comfortable having a patient with hallucinations from schizophrenia as a work colleague, if the patient was Black rather than White. Results also showed that participants scoring high on psychological mindedness were more likely to feel comfortable having a patient with schizophrenia as a work colleague, if the patient was Black rather than White. Implications of the results and suggestions for future research are also discussed.^

Subject Area

Psychology

Recommended Citation

Derron K.G Ambrose, "The Effects of Symptomology, Race and Psychological Mindedness on Attitudes toward Persons with Schizophrenia" (2018). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI10840993.
https://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI10840993

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