The impact of therapist values in the culturally diverse clinical interviewing process: A Delphi study

Ron Douglas McClanahan, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the extent cultural variables influence the initial clinical interview protocol. Five cultural groups (i.e., African-Americans, Anglo-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans and American-Indians) were evaluated. Five hundred licensed psychologists listed in The Directory of Diplomates 1997–1998 (ABPP, 1997) were contacted regarding participation. Twenty-one completed all three rounds. Phase one consisted of eight open-ended questions related to multicultural clinical interviewing protocol. The obtained information was transformed into a 228 second round questionnaire. By using Delphi analytical techniques, 40 items were then identified for evaluation in the last study phase. A Likert scale ranging from 1 = “Strongly Disagree” to 7 = “Strongly Agree” to rank perceived importance of each item was used by participating panel members. Only four items achieved a consensus of at least 80% or higher (i.e., Collaborative goal setting, approaching the session with sensitivity, displaying a respectful attitude toward the client and that individual differences should not be ignored). Implications for further research include the inclusion of cultural subgroups in a follow up study and assessment of practitioner training deficiencies related to multicultural issues. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Ron Douglas McClanahan, "The impact of therapist values in the culturally diverse clinical interviewing process: A Delphi study" (1998). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9943852.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9943852

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