Comparison of traditional -age college student-athletes' self-reported consequences of alcohol use and traditional -age college student nonathletes' self-reported consequences of alcohol use

Diane Rae Berty, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This causal-comparative, or ex post facto, study was conducted to determine if traditional-age Division I-AA student athletes and traditional-age student nonathletes attending a mid-size, urban, public, four-year university located in the southeastern United States experienced the same frequency of self-reported consequences of alcohol use as evidenced by the CORE Survey. The results were obtained from the CORE Alcohol and Other Drug Surveys administered during the spring semester, 1998. Seventy-three traditional-age intercollegiate student athlete respondents and 131 traditional-age nonathlete respondents who self-reported using no drugs other than tobacco and/or alcohol composed the working data base for this study. The data were analyzed using the chi square method and each hypothesis was tested at the.05 level of significance. The results of this study indicate there is a difference in self-reported frequency of negative consequences of alcohol use between populations. Therefore, recommendations are made concerning the continuation of the institution's, as well as other colleges and universities, efforts to assist this high-risk population of intercollegiate student athletes. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Physical|Health Sciences, Public Health

Recommended Citation

Diane Rae Berty, "Comparison of traditional -age college student-athletes' self-reported consequences of alcohol use and traditional -age college student nonathletes' self-reported consequences of alcohol use" (1998). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9907836.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9907836

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