A self-validation study of correctional officers: Does attitudinal style make a difference in job satisfaction?

Sara Thorburn Miller, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Much research has focused on the situational determinants of job satisfaction stressing external influences. In contrast this study examined the dispositional determinants by looking at attitudinal style of correctional officers in their self-report of job satisfaction. To investigate this topic, subjects were asked to volunteer from a maximum security prison and a special needs mental health and medical hospital prison. This research controlled for gender, race, age, marital status, level of education, tenure of employment in corrections, and supervisory or non-supervisory positions. Statistics used were the t-test for Independent Samples, Levene's Test for Equality of Variances, t-test for Equality of Means, and Analysis of Variance to test for significant differences in means of the variables. The main results suggest differences in attitudes between male and female correctional officers as well as supervisory and non-supervisory officers. Age and years of employment reflected differences in job satisfaction. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Industrial|Sociology, Criminology and Penology

Recommended Citation

Sara Thorburn Miller, "A self-validation study of correctional officers: Does attitudinal style make a difference in job satisfaction?" (1997). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9806344.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9806344

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