A study of the understanding and attitudes toward selected parts of the Education Improvement Act of 1992 among Tennessee superintendents and directors of schools

John Edward Calton, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to survey Tennessee public school superintendents and directors of schools regarding their understanding of and attitudes toward four areas of the Education Improvement Act of 1992: (a) roles and selection of superintendents/directors and local boards of education, (b) the Tennessee Value Added Assessment System, (c) the two-track curriculum, and (d) school based management. All 138 public school superintendents and directors of schools in Tennessee were mailed surveys. Of those mailed, 110 were returned for a return rate of 79.7%. The researcher hypothesized that there would be a high level of understanding of the four specific areas of this study. Two null hypotheses stated that there would be no significant difference in attitudes between superintendents and directors based on age, highest degree earned, years of experience, type of license, type of certification, grand division of Tennessee currently serving, method of selection, system enrollment, and years served in current capacity. Results supported the research hypothesis. Crosstabulations and Chi square tests found significant differences in attitudes based on six of the nine demographic categories. It was recommended that further research be conducted regarding the Education Improvement Act of 1992 and that lawmakers and educators carefully consider the results of this study when devising and implementing educational laws and policies. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

John Edward Calton, "A study of the understanding and attitudes toward selected parts of the Education Improvement Act of 1992 among Tennessee superintendents and directors of schools" (1995). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9608782.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9608782

Share

COinS