The perceptions of administrative support and non-support by speech pathologists employed in Tennessee's public schools

Lynn Rodney Wood, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine the nature and degree of administrative support and non-support as perceived by speech pathologists (SLPs) employed in the public schools in the State of Tennessee. This study also attempted to determine whether five demographic variables affected the perceptions of administrative support and non-support on the part of the public school SLPs. The five demographic variables were the region of employment in Tennessee, caseload size, level of education, years employed in the present position, and ASHA certification status.^ The survey instrument, the Administrative Support Questionnaire (ASQ), was developed and distributed to 628 SLPs employed in the public schools of Tennessee. The ASQ consisted of 25 items that were designed to obtain measures of perceived levels of administrative support and non-support in four categories. The categories were (a) providing adequate working conditions and resources, (b) advocating for SLPs and the speech pathology program, (c) facilitating staff development, and (d) helping with program activities. Valid questionnaires were returned by 317 (50.5%) of the target population members.^ The results of this survey study indicated the following: (a) The typical Tennessee public school speech pathologist was employed in either the Eastern or Middle Tennessee region, had a caseload size ranging from 61 to more than 100 students, had less than 11 years of experience in the position, had completed the Master's degree, and was neither ASHA certified nor completing the Clinical Fellowship Year (CFY); (b) The respondents mildly agreed with 15 (60%) items and mildly disagreed with 10 (40%) items on the ASQ; (c) The respondents indicated mild levels of administrative support in two (50%) areas and mild levels of administrative non-support in two (50%) areas of the four areas of perceived administrative support and non-support; and (d) Significantly different levels of perception of administrative support and non-support on the ASQ were determined for four of the five demographic variables. Recommendations for increasing the levels of perceived administrative support by public school speech pathologists, as well as for additional research studies, were offered. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Speech Pathology|Education, Administration|Education, Special

Recommended Citation

Lynn Rodney Wood, "The perceptions of administrative support and non-support by speech pathologists employed in Tennessee's public schools" (1995). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9608781.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9608781

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