A study of parent involvement in Tennessee: How it compares with the nation and the corresponding relationship to student achievement

Claudette Rose Williams, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Purpose of the study. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Tennessee parent involvement indicators compared with those from other national studies and the subsequent relationship of these types of involvement to student achievement.^ Methodology. The descriptive investigation of the relationships was undertaken by analyzing standard sets of survey questions administered to Tennessee public school students in grades 2 through 8 and grade 10. Data from 1990 to 1994 were utilized.^ Findings and conclusions. (1) In every aspect of study (parent-pupil ratio, reading at home, television, homework, and parent/student communication), the amount/type of parent involvement was reflected positively in higher achievement. (2) In Tennessee, a student was more likely to score higher on a standard achievement test when the following parameters were present. The higher achieving student: (a) Lived in a home with both parents, (b) Read for fun almost every day, (c) Read more than 10 pages each day, (d) Read books, (e) Saw his/her parent(s) reading at least weekly, (f) Watched television in moderation, (g) Had some rules regarding watching television, (h) Spent at least one hour on homework each day, (i) Was expected to maintain at least a B average, and (j) Discussed education/career goals with his/her parents. An increased focus on parent involvement is suggested and supported by the research presented. ^

Subject Area

Education, Sociology of|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Claudette Rose Williams, "A study of parent involvement in Tennessee: How it compares with the nation and the corresponding relationship to student achievement" (1994). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9608780.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9608780

Share

COinS