Analysis of the WISC-R subtest profiles for Black and White gifted and nongifted groups

Harry Eugene McCormick, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) profiles and patterns of Black and White gifted and nongifted students. The Bannatyne (1974) and Kaufman (1975) models were used as the methods for describing the profiles and patterns; these were investigated as possible alternatives to the Full Scale IQ score in determining giftedness in Black students. The similarities and differences of these profiles and patterns were discussed as related to age, sex, group (gifted or nongifted), and race.^ The subjects were 224 students (56 matched pairs of Black and White gifted students and 56 matched pairs of Black and White nongifted students). The gifted students had been certified as gifted according to the Tennessee State Department of Education definition and criteria. The nongifted students had been referred for potential giftedness but did not meet the criteria. The White students had been matched to the Black students on age, grade, sex, and achievement test scores. All the students had been administered the WISC-R.^ All the WISC-R subtest scores were used with the exception of Mazes. A computer program was utilized to recategorize and analyze the scores according to the Bannatyne and Kaufman models. Cross tabulations, matched t tests, and analysis of variances were applied to the means of each of the Bannatyne patterns and Kaufman profiles for the Black and White gifted and nongifted groups.^ The results of this investigation suggested that all groups, regardless of race, sex, and giftedness, were highest in the verbal and acquired knowledge areas. The Black gifted and nongifted and the White female nongifted were second highest on sequential and attention skills; their lowest areas were on spatial and perceptual tasks. The White gifted and the White male nongifted had the reverse; they were higher on spatial and perceptual tasks and lower on sequential and attention skills.^ Significant differences were found between the gifted and nongifted groups on the Bannatyne patterns and Kaufman profiles. The Black and White groups resulted in significant differences in the spatial and perceptual skills. Sex differences were found among the White nongifted group between spatial and perceptual skills and sequential and attention tasks. No significant differences were found among the age levels.^ The Black gifted group obtained a different Bannatyne pattern and Kaufman profile from the White gifted group. This profile, however, was not unique to the Black gifted group. Many patterns and profiles were exhibited when the individuals were considered. The data tended to support the previous research that the Bannatyne patterns and Kaufman profiles were not useful in individual diagnosis. The findings suggested Black gifted performed better on sequential and attention items than on spatial and perceptual tasks. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

Harry Eugene McCormick, "Analysis of the WISC-R subtest profiles for Black and White gifted and nongifted groups" (1989). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9017223.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9017223

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