A comparative study of the self -perception of administrator leadership style with the perception of one's superior, associates, and subordinates

Sondra Long, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to gain insight into self-perception of one's behavior as a leader, and the perception of her/his leadership behavior by her/his superior, associates, and subordinates. The study measured three aspects of leadership behavior: (1) style, (2) style range and flexibility, and (3) style adaptability.^ Three data-gathering instruments were used in this study: (1) the LEAD Self, (2) the LEAD Other, and (3) a demographic data questionnaire that consisted of seven questions.^ In the LEAD Self and LEAD Other instruments used in this study, each of the twelve situations theoretically called for one of four basic leadership styles. In each case the situation described something about the maturity level of a work group one might be working with in her/his role as a leader. The respondents were asked to select, from the four alternative leader behaviors, the style they perceived to be most representative of their superior's, associate's, subordinate's and their own behavior in that type of situation.^ The data obtained from the respondents were analyzed and executed in narrative and graphic form in terms of frequency and percentage of each survey item. The LEAD Matrix, a comprehensive scoring form for the LEAD instruments, was used to provide feedback on one's style, range, and adaptability.^ Among the conclusions resulting from the analysis of data, the following were deemed to be most significant: (1) High Task and High Relationship was the dominant leadership style among the leaders. (2) There was a wide range of leadership style among the leaders. (3) There was a significant level of adaptability or effectiveness among the leaders. (4) There was a significant level of leaders with the supporting secondary leadership style. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Sondra Long, "A comparative study of the self -perception of administrator leadership style with the perception of one's superior, associates, and subordinates" (1988). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI9017210.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI9017210

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