MMPI CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DSM-III BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN A FORENSIC POPULATION

LARRY W WELCH, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This investigation attempted to determine whether a distinct borderline MMPI profile would emerge in a forensic population, whether the borderline group could be significantly differentiated from three comparison groups selected from the same population, and whether group membership (diagnosis) could be predicted using discriminant analysis solutions based on MMPI variables.^ The groups were constructed from 154 adult male psychiatric inpatients committed to the Forensic Services Division (FSD) of Middle Tennessee Mental Health Institute. The mean borderline MMPI profile consisted of elevations on the Sc(8), Pa(6), D(2), Pd(4) and Pt(7) scales. While only 9 of the 39 individuals (23%) in the borderline group actually possessed such a profile, the cumulative total was raised to 89% where two-point combinations of 8-6, 8-4, 8-2, or 8-7 were included.^ Secondly, multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were performed to determine whether the borderline group differed significantly from the three comparison groups. A highly significant MANOVA indicated an overall significant difference in MMPI T score profile elevations in relation to the four diagnostic groupings. Scheffe's tests revealed the significance was between the borderline and antisocial/malingering groups. A second MANOVA was conducted using two groups. The original 39 borderline patients were compared to the remaining 115 patients collapsed into one group. An overall significance was again obtained through a Wilk's lambda. As a follow-up to the significant MANOVA's several discriminant function analyses were performed. Function I was highly loaded from the antisocial/malingerer group; Function II was loaded by the borderline group. The resulting classification analysis was successful in predicting group membership (diagnosis) for 17 of 39 (43.6%) of the borderline patients and for 26 of 36 (72.2%) of the antisocial/malingering patients. The overall four groups hit rate was 50.65%.^ Finally, a two-group discriminant Function was identified by using the original borderline group and combining the remaining 115 patients. The resulting function was found to have the most loading from the L scale. The major findings suggested that while a characteristic "borderline" MMPI profile was identified, this profile did not distinguish the borderline group from the comparison groups as found in the literature. The validity scale L was the only variable that appeared to discriminate the borderline groups from the present comparison groups. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.) ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Sociology, Criminology and Penology|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

LARRY W WELCH, "MMPI CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DSM-III BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN A FORENSIC POPULATION" (1987). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI8802639.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI8802639

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