A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF THE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION DOCTORAL PROGRAM AS PERCEIVED BY PRESENT AND FORMER STUDENTS

DAVID RICHARD MOORE, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Purpose. The objective of this study was to make a descriptive study of the Tennessee State University Educational Administration Doctoral Program as perceived by present and former students. An additional aim was to determine the personal, educational, and vocational backgrounds of the students.^ Procedures. Ninety-one students provided essential data on the Doctoral Program Questionnaire. Eleven research questions were analyzed by several statistical methods: frequency distribution, crosstabulation contingency tables, t tests, and chi square tests.^ Findings. Most of the significant differences (.05 level) which surfaced during this study were between graduates and dropouts. The major areas for these differences centered around MAT scores; major steps of the doctoral program; selections pertaining to professional, social, and intellectual advancement; academic obstacles encountered; aspects which contributed to professional development; and items which perceived the program to be relevant to the needs of the students. Sex showed significant differences regarding dissertation work, undergraduate work completed at TSU, and recommended changes in course work. Age produced a significant difference regarding change level within their vocation as a motivational reason for beginning doctoral work.^ Conclusions. Students perceived the program to be rewarding and satisfactory and felt their contribution to the profession had increased as a result of the program. Typical students chose TSU because of low cost while maintaining employment in the area and believed the program was worth the time, effort, and money. A majority were willing to recommend the program to others. One person in two was female and one person in five was a number of a racial minority. Salaries increased approximately $5,000 due to participation in the program.^ Recommendations. (1) TSU should examine this study to see if departmental goals and aspirations are being met. (2) Recruitment practices should be examined to attract more students. (3) More minorities should be recruited. (4) TSU should give incentives to attract exceptional administrators. (5) TSU should encourage all area school systems to provide financial incentives for the doctorate. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

DAVID RICHARD MOORE, "A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF THE TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION DOCTORAL PROGRAM AS PERCEIVED BY PRESENT AND FORMER STUDENTS" (1986). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI8802636.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI8802636

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