TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS AS A FUNCTION OF CONCEPTUALIZATION

GERALDINE TAYLOR FARMER, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Recent research on effective teaching has correlated student achievement with teacher classroom performance. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if the conceptual level of practicing teachers had a significant influence on classroom performance before and after inservice training. As a secondary purpose, the study compared the years of teaching experience, type of preservice teacher training, degree earned, and grade assignment to determine their relationship to classroom performance.^ Data for this study were gathered in several ways. Demographic data were gathered by having teachers respond to a questionnaire. Conceptual level data were gathered by using a semiprojective instrument and teachers were grouped as high, medium, or low, as determined by the scores. Trained observers were used to obtain data on classroom performance. The four domains of classroom performance measured were: noninteractive instruction, interactive instruction, classroom management, and off-task activities.^ An analysis of variance was calculated to determine if a significant difference existed in the classroom performance of teachers with different conceptual levels, years of experience, grade assignment, and degree earned. A t test was used to determine if a significant difference existed between classroom performance and preservice training.^ Findings. When teachers of different conceptual levels were compared there was no significant difference in the amount of time spent in noninteractive instruction. After inservice training, there was a significant difference in the amount of time spent in interactive instruction. There was no significant difference in the amount of time spent in classroom management. There was no significant difference in the amount of time spent in off-task activities. Other findings revealed a significant difference in off-task activities of teachers with different preservice training. When teachers were compared by years of experience, teachers with 11 to 15 years of experience significantly reduced off-task activities.^ Conclusions. Teachers with medium conceptual level respond best to inservice training. Teachers with less than fifteen years of experience gain most from inservice training. Teachers with less than a Master's degree gain most from inservice training. The majority of the teachers studied were in the medium conceptual level range. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

GERALDINE TAYLOR FARMER, "TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS AS A FUNCTION OF CONCEPTUALIZATION" (1986). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI8802614.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI8802614

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