THE EFFECTS OF PRERETIREMENT WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION ON WOMEN'S RETIREMENT KNOWLEDGE, ANXIETY LEVELS AND PLANNING BEHAVIORS

ANNE ELIZABETH DURRANT, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study was an exploratory investigation of the effectiveness of preretirement workshop participation to change women's retirement knowledge, anxiety levels and planning behaviors.^ The Separate-Sample Pretest Posttest research design was used to examine differences between the sexes and within female subgroups based upon their demographic characteristics of marital status, race, anticipated time from retirement, occupational level, status of health, age and yearly family income.^ The questionnaire used contained a demographic survey and instruments to measure the three variables: Retirement Knowledge Index, A-State subscale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Retirement Preparation Index. No significant differences were found between the sexes, or races, on measures of retirement knowledge, anxiety, or planning behaviors. Posttest men scored significantly lower than women on anxiety. However, women's mean score was similar to the normative test group which is slightly higher than men's. No significant differences emerged within or between female subgroups on anxiety measures. Retirement knowledge, analyzed by sex and race between conditions, yielded eight statistically significant differences.^ Thirteen statistically significant differences were found between conditional female subgroups on retirement knowledge. Gender differences on planning behavior only emerged when analyzed by specific task completion where four were found significant. Compared to women, more men had analyzed their present financial positions, prepared wills, investigated retirement-living arrangements, and checked out Social Security benefits.^ Five significant differences were found within and between conditional female subgroups. Early retirees, single, married and managerial women appeared to have made more plans. Additional statistically significant findings included negative correlations found between anxiety and planning behavior for both sexes. Positive correlations were found for all subjects and men between planning behavior and knowledge suggesting that as their knowledge increased so did their planning. Differences of r's correlation between conditions for women on knowledge and planning behavior suggested that the workshop had an effect on their planning behavior. Workshop evaluations showed both sexes rated it as excellent (95-97%). Also, correlations between anxiety, knowledge and behavior with scales for program evaluation, clearness, and value yielded six statistically significant, positive correlations.^ It was concluded that women's preretirement workshop participation did increase their knowledge of retirement issues. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.) ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology

Recommended Citation

ANNE ELIZABETH DURRANT, "THE EFFECTS OF PRERETIREMENT WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION ON WOMEN'S RETIREMENT KNOWLEDGE, ANXIETY LEVELS AND PLANNING BEHAVIORS" (1985). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI8802608.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI8802608

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