TEACHER STRESS FACTORS AS PERCEIVED BY TENNESSEE TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS

ROSEMARY WADE OWENS, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine whether teachers and principals in Tennessee have the same perceptions of stress factors. An additional aim was to determine whether age, sex, or size of school has an effect on teacher and principal perceptions of stress factors.^ The instrument used contained fifty Stress Factor items and asked for demographic information, personal health data, and stress management techniques used. The stressors were to be rated from the least amount of stress which was number one to the greatest amount of stress which was number nine. A total of 1237 teachers and 295 principals from Tennessee were randomly selected for participation in the study. The response rate for teachers was 35 percent with 436 teachers responding. The response rate for principals was 64 percent with 190 principals responding. The data were subjected to a factorial analysis of variance for main effects and two-way interactions.^ Hypothesis one predicted there would be no significant difference at the .05 level in the perception of stress factors by teachers and principals. An analysis of variance indicated that a significant difference did exist (F value of 5.73, p .02). The null hypothesis was rejected.^ Hypothesis two predicted there would be no significant difference at the .05 level in the perception of stress factors due to age of teachers or principals. There was a significant difference for teachers (F value of 9.07, p .00) and principals (F value of .51, p .48). The null hypothesis was rejected.^ Hypothesis three predicted there would be no significant difference at the .05 level in the perception of stress factors due to sex of teachers or principals. There was no significant difference (F value of .18, p .67). The null hypothesis was accepted.^ Hypothesis four predicted there would be no significant difference in the perception of stress factors due to size of school. An analysis of variance showed no significant difference at the .05 level (F value of .03, p .86). The null hypothesis was accepted.^ Hypothesis five predicted there would be no significant interaction between sex and age, sex and size of school, sex and position, age and position, age and size of school, or size of school and position. . . . (Author's abstract exceeds stipulated maximum length. Discontinued here with permission of author.) UMI ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

ROSEMARY WADE OWENS, "TEACHER STRESS FACTORS AS PERCEIVED BY TENNESSEE TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS" (1983). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI8323151.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI8323151

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