A quantitative study of the effects of service learning orientation classes on full-time, first-time freshmen

Robert R Bradley, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This quantitative study examined the effects of freshman service learning orientation classes in 2011 and 2012 on student success indicators as compared to the traditional orientation class of 2010. A random sample of 300 students for each class/cohort was selected for analysis (n=900). Using SPSS, natural break points in ACT scores were determined and each class was grouped in three categories: low, medium and high. This created nine research questions. Student success benchmarks of end-of-year GPAs, attainment of sophomore status and re-enrollment in following fall were then examined through appropriate statistical tests. The results showed a statistically significant difference between EOY freshman GPA between 2012 and 2010 high ACT groups. This null hypothesis was rejected. The rest of the null hypotheses were retained. Recommendations include design for direct collaboration between the university College of Education curriculum experts, both faculty and students, and the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement to evolve Service Leadership curriculum and project management module. This study sought to provide the host university, a land-grant HBCU in central Tennessee, with needed insights to enhance the administration’s data-driven innovations in student engagement, in particular service learning effectiveness, and to extend the literature in this emergent field of study. ^

Subject Area

Educational evaluation|Educational leadership|School counseling

Recommended Citation

Robert R Bradley, "A quantitative study of the effects of service learning orientation classes on full-time, first-time freshmen" (2015). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3723599.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3723599

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