The influence of parenting styles and self-efficacy: Impact on academic performance at an HBCU

Shenita Head, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate how parenting styles and self-efficacy relates to academic performance at an HBCU. The study included 135 (91 females and 41 males) African American participants from Tennessee State University. The Parental Authority Questionnaire (Buri, 1991) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995) were used, in addition to a demographic questionnaire that asked specific questions about GPA scores. Participants provided permission to the researcher to confirm their GPA scores through the Tennessee State University records office. Results showed no relationship between parenting styles and academic performance, and there was no relationship between self-efficacy and academic performance. Parenting styles and self-efficacy were not predictors of academic performance. There was a significant relationship between African American students and authoritarian parenting styles. Statistical analyses were performed with multiple regression, a one-way ANOVA, and one sample t-tests. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Behavioral|Education, Adult and Continuing|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies|Psychology, Cognitive|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Shenita Head, "The influence of parenting styles and self-efficacy: Impact on academic performance at an HBCU" (2014). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3641777.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3641777

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