An exploration of the family functioning, family roles, and family strengths of African American adult children of alcoholics

Carmen B Bucknor, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study explored the impact of the presence of family roles and family strengths as well as measured the level of family functioning in the families of African American adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs). A total of 181 African American undergraduate or graduate student participants completed 6 questionnaires that explored variables of childhood roles, family strengths, and family functioning. It was predicted that the majority of the sample would endorse the presence of African American family strengths and that there would be differences between those who considered themselves ACOA and those who were non-ACOA on measures of family functioning and presence of family roles. Descriptive analysis and inferential analysis revealed results similar to other literature in that there were few significant differences between ACOAs and non-ACOAs. Regarding overall family functioning, non-ACOAs rated their families as less healthy than did ACOAs. This study contributes to current literature on African American families by providing updated information about how African American families function in general, and how African American families with an alcoholic member also function. It also adds to the literature on adult children of alcoholics in general, widening the body of knowledge as it considers cultural factors.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Psychology, Behavioral|Psychology, Counseling|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Carmen B Bucknor, "An exploration of the family functioning, family roles, and family strengths of African American adult children of alcoholics" (2014). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3641774.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3641774

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