Educating for societal contribution and positive diversity at a two-year community college

David J. B. Gerth, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study investigated whether there were statistically significant differences of academic performance and student satisfaction between students treated with Educating for Human Greatness (EfHG)-inspired strategies and non-EfHG comparison groups in a course at a Southeastern community college. Student satisfaction, a precursor of student retention, was measured as a substitute for student retention because of time constraints. The research design held institutional variables and the instructor constant while academic performance and student satisfaction were measured in the different groups. Students were enrolled in both onground and online sections of the course. The study attempted to determine the effectiveness of the course designs influenced by the Stoddard model (2010). The study found that academic performance was the same in the four comparison groups. However, student satisfaction was greater in the onground EfHG group than in the onground non-EfHG group. There was no significant difference in student satisfaction in the online EfHG and the online non-EfHG groups.^

Subject Area

Education, Community College|Education, Evaluation|Education, Pedagogy|Education, Teacher Training

Recommended Citation

David J. B. Gerth, "Educating for societal contribution and positive diversity at a two-year community college" (2014). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3623156.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3623156

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