Diagnostic differences in relationships with voices, beliefs about voices, and coping methods

Heather Joppich, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to explore differences in relationships with voices, beliefs about voices, and coping methods for individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. One-hundred-fifteen participants recruited from social networking sites completed the VAY (Hayward et al., 2008), BAVQ-R, (Chadwick et al., 2000), and the Brief COPE (Carver, 1997). A profile analysis revealed the patterns of differences and similarities among the three groups. On average, few significant differences were found. The results indicated that individuals with schizoaffective disorder had a more negative experience with voices than people with bipolar disorder, consistent with previous research (Joppich, 2011). All three groups were equally likely to use adaptive coping methods. The content of the voices did not differ based on diagnosis. Strengths of the study include the use of a community-dwelling sample and the geographic diversity of participants. Limitations included the self-report of diagnosis by participants. The study was exploratory in nature and offered promising results for understanding similarities and differences in the voice hearing experience of individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder. Future research should continue to examine potential differences in diagnoses to further improve the diagnosing of voice hearers.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Mental Health|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Heather Joppich, "Diagnostic differences in relationships with voices, beliefs about voices, and coping methods" (2014). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3594931.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3594931

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