The relationship between student voice and perceptions of motivation, attachment, achievement and school climate in Davidson and Rutherford counties

Sharon Elizabeth Matthews, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which there were statistically significant relationships between school administrators' systemic implementation of student voice work and student perceptions (i.e. achievement, motivation, attachment and school climate) and PLAN performance. Student voice was defined as students being equal partners in school decision making (Mitra, 2006). Seminal theories supported students having a verbal place in the school community (Dewey, 1916; Friere, 1968; Vygotsky, 1926). The literature review included research on student voice and climate, achievement, motivation and attachment, student voice work frameworks and survey instruments. Three high schools from two Counties in Tennessee participated in this study. The author used a random stratified sampling technique to survey administrators and students. The author created school profiles based on Fielding's (2004b) typology, administrator's responses to items on the Organizational Support for Youth Engagement Tool (ORG-YET) survey and clarification questions. The author surveyed 10th grade students using The My Voice Student Aspirations Survey. The data analysis revealed correlation results to reject the null hypotheses that there is no statistically significant relationship between the implementation of student voice work and student perceptions of climate; motivation; attachment; achievement. The results indicated to retain the hypotheses with PLAN performance as an additional variable. There were no statistically significant interactive effects on student's PLAN performance at the students' gender * ethnicity * voice * school designation intersection. The regression model revealed combined perceptions of climate, motivation, achievement, attachment and voice were not statistically significant predictors of PLAN performance. However, embedded correlations in this model showed that increased levels of authentic student voice work reduce factors that indirectly relate to test performance, school disconnect and motivation. Mutual understanding of authentic student voice work eliminates paradigm discrepancies and can lead to more school satisfaction. The results can inform student voice practices for integration into the overall school improvement plan and at district levels.^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Sharon Elizabeth Matthews, "The relationship between student voice and perceptions of motivation, attachment, achievement and school climate in Davidson and Rutherford counties" (2010). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3413702.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3413702

Share

COinS