The impact of education programs on compliance in human subjects research

Quincy Jamal Byrdsong, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study investigated how education programs impact compliance in human subjects research. Participants were one hundred and twenty-one academic medical centers recognized by the Association of Academic Medical Centers (AAMC) which have discrete medical school data reporting and receive federal funds to conduct research. The instrument used was a data collection tool which consisted of the participant institutions with respect to the following descriptive variables: number of faculty, number of students, amount of research funding, trainees as principal investigators, education programs in human protections and determination letters of non-compliance. Simple linear regression was performed on all descriptive variables of the academic medical centers as predictor variables with the exception of non-compliance which was the criterion variable. Bivariate correlation was also performed using the same predictor and criterion variables. Partial correlation was performed to examine relationships between education programs and letters of non-compliance when controlled for number of faculty and amount of research funding. Education programs were not statistically significant predictors of non-compliance in human subjects research. Both amount of research funding and faculty size were statistically significantly predictors for non-compliance in human subjects research. Additionally, the amount of research funding and faculty size had statistically significant positive relationships with letters on non-compliance; the more research funding and larger faculty size indicated a higher likelihood that an institution would be noncompliant. There were no statistically significant relationships between education programs and compliance even when amount of research funding and faculty size were held constant. These findings suggest that an increased number of education programs and platforms need to be considered in order to optimally ensure the protections of human subjects in research. An emphasis on ensuring training for all necessary individuals may provide more protections for human subjects than the nature of the education program itself. ^

Subject Area

Education, Health|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Quincy Jamal Byrdsong, "The impact of education programs on compliance in human subjects research" (2010). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3404132.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3404132

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