Gender role conflict as a predictor of date rape variables in African American men

Anna Goodwin Settle, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Gender role conflict as a predictor of date rape variables in African American men were investigated. Participants included African-American students enrolled in an HBCU in the Southeast. The GRCS was used to assess men’s level of GRC. In addition, African-American women were asked to rate their partners’ levels of GRC using the GRCS as a rating scale. Two date rape measures were used to assess men’s negative relational aggression, in addition to women’s perceptions of their partners’ negative relational aggression. Using Logistical Regression, the results indicated that, for the men, all areas of gender role conflict, including SPC, RE, RABBM, and CBWFR were predictive of their rape tolerant attitudes and endorsement of rape myths. For the women, all areas of GRCS excluding CBWFR were predictive of perceived rape tolerant attitudes and endorsement of rape myths by their partners. While LR was useful in determining group membership into “high” and “low” date rape groups, there was no evidence to support that these groups were related to actual risk of committing date rape.^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Clinical|Gender Studies

Recommended Citation

Anna Goodwin Settle, "Gender role conflict as a predictor of date rape variables in African American men" (2008). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3369536.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3369536

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