Construct validity and short-term test-retest reliability of the Fear of the Feminine projective test

Denise A Reding, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Fear of the Feminine (FOF) projective test in a male population. The main aim of the FOF is to assess men's fear of the feminine, to assist men in recognizing and understanding their fear of the feminine, as well as to evaluate to what degree it affects men's lives (e.g., as a censor and impetus for psychological defenses). The ten images of the FOF were selected based upon six definitions; four of which were taken from the O'Neil et al. (1986) Gender Role Conflict (GRC) paradigm subscales, which purports to be based upon the fear of the feminine. The other two definitions are based upon analytic psychology notions of the Phallic Woman and Engulfing Mother (Blazina, Reding, & Kierski, 2007). Responses and interpretation were based on content analysis, using the FOF scoring system. Additional instruments were used in order to evaluate subjects' overall psychological well being as well as their gender role conflict. The additional assessment tools used were the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Gender Role Conflict Scale (GRCS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18). Results indicated that the Fear of the Feminine Projective Test is a valid and reliable projective test measure allowing the skilled clinician to identify and gauge some of the dominant defenses, emotions, and fears that men experience on a conscious and unconscious level related to what is defined as the feminine. Directions for future research and suggestions for appropriate uses of the FOF are provided.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Psychometrics|Gender Studies

Recommended Citation

Denise A Reding, "Construct validity and short-term test-retest reliability of the Fear of the Feminine projective test" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3369535.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3369535

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