The quality of student life and its impact on retention at an urban historically black university

Christopher A Duke, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study assessed the level of student satisfaction of students enrolled at Fisk University in the areas of Academic Integration, Social Integration, Overall Institutional Quality, and Overall Institutional Satisfaction. This study also determined whether differences existed in the perceptions of students on the quality of student life based on gender, age, ethnicity, citizenship status, choice, class load, current grade point average, education goal, employment, current residential status, class level, and student institutional intention. ^ The participants for this study were 89 students enrolled at Fisk University from 2006-2008. The students, were placed into two classifications: (1) Residential-students, (2) commuter-students. ^ The instrumentation used for this study was the Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) developed by Noel-Levitz, Inc. This inventory measured student perceptions of the quality of services provided by the university. There were 82 questions designed to examine the student’s college experience. Five null hypotheses were used to guide this study. ^ Findings of the study were as follows: (1) gender differences do exist between male and female students as it relates to elements of student satisfaction and academic integration. Male students showed a higher level of satisfaction; (2) there is a significant relationship between academic integration and a student’s overall institutional satisfaction for students who re-enroll based on residential status; (3) there is no relationship between social integration and a student’s overall institutional satisfaction rating based on classification; (4) there is no relationship between a student’s overall institutional satisfaction rating based on employment; and (5) residential status did not have an effect on a student’s perception of institutional quality and overall institutional satisfaction. ^ Based on the findings of the study, this researcher concludes that positive academic involvement and social engagement by students enrolled at an institution; are good indicators that they have a greater chance of persisting and graduating from that institution than those students who are not. ^ This researcher recommends that HBCUs actively maintain campus environments that are sensitive to student perceptions of the academic and social climate. All components of the institution must work in concert to achieve the highest level possible toward student retention. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Christopher A Duke, "The quality of student life and its impact on retention at an urban historically black university" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3356158.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3356158

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