Reservation gaming: A catalyst for self -governance for the tribes of Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma

Teresa Joy Clay, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The passage of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 has allowed Native American tribes a new form of revenue generation. This new source of revenue facilitates entry into the U.S. political system and furthers the attainment of self-governance and economic development goals on reservations as demonstrated through educational achievement, low poverty and unemployment levels, and increases in wealth such as offering more family housing units for its tribal members. While several works exist regarding benefits reaped by indigenous populations in the United States as a whole, the academic literature regarding the impact of reservation gaming on the areas of social achievement, tribal political behavior, and social policies is sorely lacking at the tribal level. This study evaluates the role of Indian gaming revenue as a catalyst for self-governance, political strength, and economic development by answering the question: has the passage of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 made a difference in social program growth and tribal wealth for Native American tribes in the States of Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma? The outcomes of this study will prove beneficial to the literature on Native American studies as evidence of the impacts of reservation gaming and its consequent policy externalities will enhance policy makers’ ability to implement and maintain effective policy regarding Native American sovereignty, equitable gaming oversight, and revenue disbursement. ^

Subject Area

Political Science, Public Administration|Native American Studies

Recommended Citation

Teresa Joy Clay, "Reservation gaming: A catalyst for self -governance for the tribes of Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3356138.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3356138

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