African American women, childhood sexual abuse, resilience, and HIV risks: Implications for a culturally sensitive counseling model

Cynthia D Jackson, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to further the research in the area of childhood sexual abuse as a possible precursor to HIV risk factors among African American (AA) women, and to explore ways of navigating those risk factors. Most studies have sought to investigate predictors of HIV risk, and have used models of behavior that do not consider power in relationships between women and their partners. Despite conceptual contributions, current theoretical models of behavior do not easily accommodate contextual personal and socio-cultural variables such as gender and racial/ethnic culture (Amaro & Rao, 2000). Results show that AA women are concerned about contracting the HIV virus. Many AA women report an understanding of what it means to practice healthy decision-making. Cognitively, these women understand it is safer to use condoms during sexual intercourse, understand power in relationship dynamics, and understand what it means to be resilient from early childhood negative influences, however, CSA has a way of inappropriately practicing those decisions, therefore, putting them at risk for HIV. They also felt that societal factors such as: community relationships and the criminal laws prohibit CSA survivors from seeking help for the traumatic event. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Women's Studies|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Cynthia D Jackson, "African American women, childhood sexual abuse, resilience, and HIV risks: Implications for a culturally sensitive counseling model" (2008). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3320159.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3320159

Share

COinS