An examination of factors that contribute to African Americans inability to seek professional psychological help

Andre O Bean, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined how cultural mistrust, religious beliefs, gender role conflicts, and history of mental health experience would impact attitudes of African American toward psychotherapy. The sample consisted of 194 African Americans students attending Tennessee State University and 94 who lived in an identified community in Nashville, TN. Participants completed the Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), Religious Orientation Scale (ROS), Gender Role Conflict Scale (GCRS) and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale (ATSPPH). Pearson r correlations did not indicate a relationship between cultural mistrust and gender role conflicts was not supported but was approaching the level of significance, r(196) = -.131, p = .067. However, correlations were conducted to assess the positive relationship between gender role conflicts and attitudes towards seeking psychological help. The data supported a significant positive relationship between the two variables contrary to the stated hypothesis r (192) = .226, p = .001. Thus concluding that a more masculine belief did not yield a person to seek out psychological. Limitations of this study, as well as implications and recommendations for future research and practice, are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Andre O Bean, "An examination of factors that contribute to African Americans inability to seek professional psychological help" (2007). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3320153.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3320153

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