On-site versus remote instruction utilizing interactive television in nursing: A comparison of performance and attitudes at Columbia State Community College

Susan Moore Russell, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This research was conducted to explore the distance education experience of nursing students at Columbia State Community College in Columbia and Franklin, Tennessee. Three of the four major nursing classes in the nursing program are taught utilizing interactive television. One hundred thirty-three surveys were completed by students in three nursing courses. One course served as a pilot for the study. One course was examined regarding academic achievement as measured by students' performance on tests. Each of 350 test questions was coded as originating from the on-site or the remote instructor and percentage correct was calculated for each student for both instructors. Analysis of data utilizing a t-test revealed no significant difference in academic achievement. Students' perception of engagement and satisfaction in this same course was compared to another nursing course with two sections, each taught traditionally with different instructors on separate campuses. Kruskal-Wallis H tests were performed and revealed that student engagement and student satisfaction were both rated significantly higher in the course taught traditionally. On the issues of students' perception of the instructor's quality of communication, instructor availability, instructor sense of humor, and instructor knowledge, a series of t-tests all revealed that the on-site class fared significantly better than the remote class utilizing interactive television. ^

Subject Area

Education, Community College|Health Sciences, Education|Education, Technology of

Recommended Citation

Susan Moore Russell, "On-site versus remote instruction utilizing interactive television in nursing: A comparison of performance and attitudes at Columbia State Community College" (2008). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3307574.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3307574

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