Connections between supervisors with musical training and music achievement

Kennda Ross, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The results of this study indicate that the increased levels of both guidance and accountability provided to the music students whose teachers are supervised by a musically trained supervisor have greater music achievement. The sample for this study includes 265 fourth grade students from Tennessee's public schools. Of those 265 students 135 of them are students in a school system with a musically trained supervisor, the remaining 130 were from five different school systems with a general supervisor with no musical training. The instrument utilized to conduct the test was Colwell's Music Achievement Test #1, which test the skills pitch discrimination, interval discrimination, and meter discrimination. Of the six hypotheses tested, four were found to be significant and two were not. The four that were found to be significant were: (a) hypothesis one regarding students of a musically trained supervisor scoring significantly higher than the students of the general supervisor with no musical training, (b) hypothesis four regarding students who have had additional piano instruction scoring significantly higher than the students who had no additional piano instruction, (c) hypothesis five in that the type of supervisor remained statistically significant even when based on differing amounts of weekly instructional time for the students, and (d) hypothesis number six which determined that those students of the music supervisor whom had the use of a piano lab did score significantly higher than the students of the general supervisor with no piano lab. Therefore in regards to hypothesis number six, the use of the piano was proven to have a significant effect ( p < .05); however the difference was even greater for those with a musically trained supervisor with no piano lab when compared with the students of the general supervisor. Therefore supervisor type proved to have an even greater effect (p < .001). There were two hypotheses where the null hypotheses were retained due to the lack of significant differences. These variables that were not found to have a significant effect on student's Music Achievement Test scores were gender, and additional instrumental lessons. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Music

Recommended Citation

Kennda Ross, "Connections between supervisors with musical training and music achievement" (2007). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3279049.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3279049

Share

COinS