An analysis of African American doctoral students: Contributing factors that impact perseverance and graduation

Rubin Cockrell, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined the experiences of African American doctoral students and the contributing factors that impact their graduate school experiences. This study helped to fill a current void in available graduate school literature. The data for this study was arrived from a perceptions survey administered to African American doctoral students. The perceptions survey explored factors that contributed to participants' perseverance in completing their degree, the role race played in their student experiences prior to and during their doctoral studies, and how their perceptions of their ethnicity impacted their student successes. The perceptions survey was administered to 197 Southern Regional Educational Board Doctoral Scholars recipients. The overall survey results identified that a combination of spirituality, family, and personal selves were the biggest contributing factors to the success of African American doctoral students. The perceived role of race, perceptions of race, perceptions of social acceptability, and students' overall perceptions had no significant relationships or differences based on the type of institution that African American doctoral students attended.^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Education, Administration|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Rubin Cockrell, "An analysis of African American doctoral students: Contributing factors that impact perseverance and graduation" (2007). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3259047.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3259047

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