Attitudes and perceptions toward inclusion among secondary special and general education teachers working in north Alabama schools

Casey D Lewis, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of secondary general and special education teachers toward inclusion of students with disabilities which has been an evolutionary process that can be attributed to landmark legislation, litigation, and policy in the last half of the 20 th century. The SPSS software was used to identify the results from the Opinions Related to Integration (ORI) questionnaire, 129 teachers participated, 66 (51%) were secondary special education teachers and 63 (49%) were general education teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the survey responses for the normality of distributions. In addition, an unpaired t-test was used to determine if there were any significant mean differences between secondary special and general educators teaching in an inclusive setting. A statistically significant difference was found in: Benefits of Integration; Perceived Ability to Teach Students with Disabilities; and Special versus Integrated General Education. Inclusion Classroom Management found no statistical difference.^

Subject Area

Education, Special

Recommended Citation

Casey D Lewis, "Attitudes and perceptions toward inclusion among secondary special and general education teachers working in north Alabama schools" (2006). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3234218.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3234218

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