An examination of factors which influence the attitudes of African American males toward psychotherapy

Evans Philippa M, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined cultural mistrust, racial identity and masculinity as influences on the attitudes of African American males toward psychotherapy. The sample consisted of 101 African American male undergraduate and graduate students. Participants completed the Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), Racial Identity Attitudes Scale (RIAS-B), Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) Gender Role Conflict Scale (GCRS) and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale (ATSPPH). Pearson r correlations indicated a significant relationship between racial identity and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help (r = -.314), but no significant correlation between cultural mistrust and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help (r = -.184), nor between masculinity and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help (r = -.045, .010, -.225). A regression analysis, with cultural mistrust, racial identity and masculinity as predictor variables and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help as the criterion, indicated no significant predictors ( R = .135, R2 = .060). Limitations of this study, as well as implications and recommendations for future research and practice, are discussed.^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Evans Philippa M, "An examination of factors which influence the attitudes of African American males toward psychotherapy" (2006). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3234215.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3234215

Share

COinS