Teacher burnout factors: A study of teachers in the Maury County, Tennessee, school system

Ricky D. Mabry, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examines the factors that play a significant role in teacher burnout among 356 elementary, middle, and high school teachers in the Maury County School System in Tennessee. Participants responded to 20 questions on The Teacher Burnout Scale (Richmond, Wrench, & Gorham, 2001), which measures teacher burnout, and a Teacher Background Survey, which addressed salary satisfaction, teaching experience, principal support, class size, highest degree obtained by teacher, student behavior, gender of teacher, school type, ethnicity of teacher, age of teacher, school level, grade level taught, teacher participation in decision making, and student population. This research used a causal comparative design. The results of the data analysis showed 60.4 percent had no evidence of burnout whereas 39.6 percent showed evidence of burnout. The teacher background page in relationship to The Teacher Burnout Scale showed the following: Teachers who felt their salaries were adequate had the highest level of burnout. Likewise teachers who felt unsupported by the principal or were neutral had the highest level of burnout. Also, teachers who rated students as not being well behaved had the highest level of burnout. The teachers who experienced the highest level of teacher burnout were teachers who taught the 10th, third, and second grades, respectively. The teachers who experienced the highest level of teacher burnout as a result of teacher participation in decision-making were those who did not feel their principal allowed teacher participation. The teachers who experienced the highest level of teacher burnout were those who responded neutrally or who felt unprepared. The teachers who experienced the highest level of teacher burnout taught in schools with student populations between 301–500. There was no statistically significant difference between teacher burnout and gender, school location, ethnicity, teacher age, school level, years of teaching experience, class size, or highest degree obtained by the teachers. Recommendations as a result of this study include a comprehensive study of two or more school systems concentrating on the variables of grade taught; teacher participation; principal support; and teacher participation in decision making, teacher preparedness, and student population. Professional development is recommended for teachers at risk for burnout. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

Ricky D. Mabry, "Teacher burnout factors: A study of teachers in the Maury County, Tennessee, school system" (2005). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3187599.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3187599

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