Women's colleges: Results of a single -sex environment on salaries, advanced degrees, and leadership positions

Carla Gale Hatfield, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined the effect attendance at single-sex college had on career success and advanced degrees of graduates. A questionnaire was used to gather data from women alumni of a coeducational institution and a single-sex institution who attended during 1990–1995. The questionnaire consisted of six categories: salary, current educational level, leadership positions in college, leadership positions after college, year graduated, and ethnicity. The responses were tabulated and analyzed to determine the effect attendance at coed or single-sex institution had on women alumni. ^ An ordinal number was assigned to each $10,000 increment of salary range in ascending order. Levels of education were represented by assigned ordinal number and calculated by Chi-square. Number of leadership positions during and after college were counted and tabulated using Mann Whitney U. ^ Four hypotheses were tested at the .01 level for salary, educational level, leadership positions in college, leadership positions outside college, year graduated, and ethnicity. The results of Chi-square test revealed women alumnae who attended Converse Women's College (single-sex) held more degrees at master's (22% versus 8.23%) and doctoral (1.27% versus .42%) levels compared to Mars Hill. Converse Women's College had more doctoral students (1.98%) than Mars Hill College (.14%). The results of a Mann Whitney U indicated that 36% of Converse Women's College alumnae earned more income ($30,000 to $39,000) than 35% Mars Hill College alumnae ($20,000 to $29,000). ^ A Mann Whitney U was conducted regarding leadership positions in college and outside college. Converse Women's College alumnae on average held 1.8 leadership positions in college, compared to 1.0 from Mars Hill. Similar results were found in leadership positions held outside college. On average Converse Women's College alumnae held 1.7 positions outside college, compared to Mars Hill alumnae who held 1.2 leadership positions outside college on average. ^

Subject Area

Women's Studies|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Carla Gale Hatfield, "Women's colleges: Results of a single -sex environment on salaries, advanced degrees, and leadership positions" (2004). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3158439.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3158439

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