Has Title IX enforcement had an adverse effect on the number of participation opportunities at NCAA Division I institutions for male student athletes?

William K Head, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study included a review of extant literature focused on the impact of Title IX enforcement on the participatory opportunities for male student athletes at NCAA Division I institutions. The study has focused on the demise of participatory opportunities for male student athletes at NCAA Division I institutions resulting from the proliferation of opportunities for females under the tenets of proportionality. ^ Briefly, the argument against proportionality has as its basis an objection to being forced to hold down the number of men participants because of a lack of female participants. Even though an institution has x number of participatory opportunities funded and available for females it cannot count those opportunities in it proportionality equation unless there is a person occupying those particular positions (Lynch 2002). The cry of foul from the male side of the equation is that this particular tenet doesn't take into consideration the level of interest of the female athletes relative to being able to fill the positions available forcing institutions to hold down male participation until adequate numbers of women can be acquired to equalize the numbers. Those institutions in an effort to expedite the effort simply discontinue men's programs to bring their programs into compliance. ^ This study has examined the trends relative to participation by men versus women since the passage of Title IX up to 1991 and the effects since the declaration of proportionality as the only safe haven in 1992. The research yielded the following findings: there was a statistical difference at the .05 level or better in the participation levels for men versus women between 1981–91 and 1992–2002 at NCAA Division I institutions. Further, this trend was prevalent throughout four year institutions. There was also a significant statistical difference at the .05 level or better in programs lost to men versus women at NCAA Division I institutions since 1992. This statistical difference is even more compelling when all four-year institutions are included. There was no significant difference at the .05 level or better in the number of programs instituted for men versus men versus women between 1981–1991 and 1992–2001. This was consistent with the findings associated with all four years institution during that same period. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Physical|Recreation

Recommended Citation

William K Head, "Has Title IX enforcement had an adverse effect on the number of participation opportunities at NCAA Division I institutions for male student athletes?" (2003). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3141943.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3141943

Share

COinS