An evaluation of the computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers

Anne Sauder Wall, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Preservice teachers with lower computer self-efficacy are more likely to have problems with technology integration when they exit their teacher education programs and teach in their own classrooms. This study identified differences in the computer self-efficacy between subgroups of preservice teachers at Austin Peay State University and Tennessee State University. ^ The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale, a 30 question survey, was given to 121 preservice teachers during the spring semester of 2004. Descriptive data were analyzed, and parametric and non-parametric tests were performed to determine if statistically significant differences existed in the computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers based on demographic information. Participants were grouped by age category, gender, ethnicity, area of licensure, credit hours of technology courses, access to technology, and school attended. ^ Results of the study indicated the majority of the preservice teachers in this study had a high to very high level of computer self-efficacy. Ethnicity was found to have a statistically significant effect on computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers. The African American preservice teachers in this study had a significantly higher level of computer self-efficacy than the Caucasian preservice teachers. Additionally, the teacher education university the preservice teachers attended was found to have a statistically significant effect on their computer self-efficacy when the Tennessee State University group was divided into two groups: those preservice teachers who attended their teacher education program on the main campus and those who attended on the Volunteer State Community College campus. The preservice teachers who attended the teacher education program at the main campus of Tennessee State University had significantly higher levels of computer self-efficacy than those who attended the teacher education program at the Volunteer State Community College campus of Tennessee State University. ^

Subject Area

Education, Teacher Training|Education, Technology of|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Anne Sauder Wall, "An evaluation of the computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers" (2004). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3141940.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3141940

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