Permanent teacher preparation and administrative oversight in support of substitute teachers

Michael B Morgan, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined the support provided to substitute teachers by permanent teachers and school administrators. Permanent teachers' practices in providing lesson plans, materials, communication, and peer support were targeted. School administrators' practices in overseeing permanent teachers' preparations and in supporting the professional development of substitute teachers were also targeted. The study also identified differences in perceptions among permanent teachers, school administrators, and substitute teachers pertaining to the nature and degree of quality of these practices. The sample (N = 259) included permanent teachers, school administrators, and substitute teachers from elementary schools in the Metropolitan Nashville School District. Data were gathered using questionnaires. In the findings, permanent and substitute teachers reported that lesson plans, materials, communication, and peer support were provided at the levels suggested by educational literature at a degree of frequency best described by the term “often”. Statistically significant differences between permanent teachers' and substitute teachers' perceptions of the degree of these practices were indicated. Substitute teachers' revealed that it was their perception that these items were received at a lesser degree of frequency than that reported by permanent teachers. School administrators, when asked about setting expectations for and monitoring of permanent teachers' preparations for substitute teachers, indicated a frequency of practice best described as “often.” Permanent teachers, asked correlating questions about school administrators' practices, indicated the frequency of practices was best described as “sometimes.” Differences in permanent teachers' and administrators' perceptions were statistically significant. When asked about practices relating to the support of substitute teachers in the schools or the provision of professional growth opportunities including evaluation and training, school administrators reported their frequency of practice as “sometimes” or “rarely.” When asked correlating questions, substitute teachers reported administrators' practices in these areas as “rarely” or “never.” A statistically significant difference in their perceptions was present. Substitute teachers perceived administrators' frequency of practice to be less than administrators reported. Other results revealed that permanent teachers “often” support substitute teachers by setting student behavioral expectations and offering assistance. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Teacher Training

Recommended Citation

Michael B Morgan, "Permanent teacher preparation and administrative oversight in support of substitute teachers" (2004). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3141939.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3141939

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