Administrators' perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools

James Ray Lindsey, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of administrators currently being impacted by standards-based reforms in Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools. The implementation of standardized tests as assessment tools and “high stakes” testing has generated controversy within the education profession. This study explored the current perceived effects of the standards-based reform movement. ^ A Likert-scale survey adapted from the work of Mark Weichel (2002) was sent to 235 principals and assistant principals in the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. The survey was divided into five subscales (affects) testing administrators' perceptions of how standards-based reforms were impacting teachers, students, administration, resource allocation, and instruction. All five subscales and their individual items were treated to statistical analyses with seven demographic variables: administrator's position (principal or assistant principal), gender, age, ethnicity, years of experience; percentage of students on free or reduced-price lunches; and amount of standards-based reform training. The level of significance was .01. ^ Findings indicate differences based on a number of perceived subscale affects and individual subscale items. Assistant principals had more negative perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on instruction; minority administrators had more negative perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on teachers; administrators with 6–10 years of experience had more negative perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on resource allocation; and administrators with little to no standards-based training had more negative perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on students and instruction. Overall affect results showed a neutral perception towards the effects of standards-based reforms on teachers, positive perceptions towards the effects of standards-based reforms on students and instruction; and negative perceptions towards the effects of standards-based reforms on administration and resource allocation. ^ This study gave rise to several recommendations. School curricula should include content development at a level deeper than comprehension by implementing grading rubrics which allow for more individualized instruction. Administrators should develop greater collegiality so as to assist newer administrators in implementing reforms. ^ Recommendations resulting from this study also include continuing research of standards-based reforms, as the movement is still in its infancy. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

James Ray Lindsey, "Administrators' perceptions of the effects of standards-based reforms on Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools" (2004). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3141936.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3141936

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