The academic differences between post-baccalaureate and traditional undergraduate teacher education students at Trevecca Nazarene University

Amy Taylor Heckman, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a statistically significant academic difference between post-baccalaureate and traditional undergraduate students and program completers at Trevecca Nazarene University. For the purpose of this study, nontraditional students were classified as students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate program at Trevecca Nazarene University. Traditional students were classified as those who had not obtained a baccalaureate degree. Students from both groups were either currently enrolled in the teacher education program at Trevecca Nazarene University or had completed the teacher education program within the past five years. Variables such as grade point average, Praxis Series test scores, age, gender, ethnicity, number of dependents, and number of outside school activities were analyzed to determine assumptions. Five null hypotheses involved the comparison of the post-baccalaureate group and the traditional student group. An independent t test, a phi coefficient or Cramer's V, a one-way ANOVA, and a chi-square test were utilized for statistical analyses between the two groups. Four hypotheses were retained and one was rejected. Statistically significant differences were found between the post-baccalaureate group and traditional undergraduate group concerning grade point averages and perceptions of the post-baccalaureate program. Statistically significant differences and relationships were also found between the groups concerning age, gender, ethnicity, and number of dependents. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups concerning Praxis Series test scores. There were also no statistically significant relationships found between the two groups concerning the relationship of the number of outside school activities. Research pertaining to the implementation of age-diversified teacher education programs should continue. Further research could disclose techniques that promote increased student learning, motivation, and achievement. Based on the findings of this study, it was recommended that future research include other geographic locations; investigations of alternative program designs, admission procedures, and course offerings conducive to nontraditional students' schedules; examinations of recruitment procedures at universities to facilitate efforts at becoming more diverse institutions; and investigations involving university professors' knowledge concerning the subject of adult learning. ^

Subject Area

Education, Teacher Training|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Amy Taylor Heckman, "The academic differences between post-baccalaureate and traditional undergraduate teacher education students at Trevecca Nazarene University" (2004). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3141934.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3141934

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