A study of the relationship between the method of instruction in science and achievement in non-public elementary schools in Middle Tennessee

Betsy R Potts, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between two methods of teaching science and scale score gains on standardized achievement tests in non-public schools in Middle Tennessee. The population was comprised of third and fourth grade students from non-public schools in Middle Tennessee that were members of the Tennessee Association of Independent Schools. A random sample of 596 students participated in this study. An unpaired t-test was conducted to determine whether the gain scores of the two instructional groups were statistically different at the .05 level, as well as whether the type of instruction affected any particular ethnic group. An analysis of variance was conducted to test the intervening variables of gender and number of years of teacher experience. ^ The results of the analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in scale score gains in science between students who were taught using an inquiry-based approach and those who were taught in a traditional setting. A statistically significant difference was found in scale score gains between the two instructional groups with regard to the number of years of teacher experience. There was inclusive evidence to show any significant difference in scale score gains between the two instructional groups with regard to gender or ethnicity. The overall findings made a case for inquiry-based science teaching in an environment that mirrored the scientific community with its questioning, problem solving, and construction of new knowledge. ^

Subject Area

Education, Sciences|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Betsy R Potts, "A study of the relationship between the method of instruction in science and achievement in non-public elementary schools in Middle Tennessee" (2003). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3116155.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3116155

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