The impact of inclusion on teacher burnout

Tonya Lyn Stephan Cunningham, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This research analyzes the impact of inclusion on teacher burnout for teachers of grades 1–4 in Clarksville/Montgomery County, Tennessee elementary schools. The survey instruments utilized in this study were the Jerabek's Burnout Inventory (JBI) and a short demographic survey. The JBI was utilized to measure the four burnout elementary primary to Jerabek's model of burnout, including emotional exhaustion, general exhaustion, depersonalization and disinterest in job. The demographic survey was related to classroom experiences that relate to burnout and were considered in relationship to the JBI. The results revealed that in male teachers experience slightly higher levels of burnout than female. Teachers age 60 and above experience the greatest levels of burnout. Teachers with a range of experience between zero and ten years of experience encountered the highest levels of burnout. Teachers attaining the highest degree level experienced higher levels of burnout than other teachers. Regular education teachers experienced the greatest levels of burnout follow by regular education inclusion teachers and then special education teachers. Teachers with 15–10 hours of professional special education training experienced the greatest levels of burnout. Teachers who co-taught with another certified teacher for 30 minutes or less per day experienced the greatest levels of burnout. Teachers with the fewest number of students and/or the highest number of identified special education students experienced higher levels of burnout and teachers utilizing the traditional textbook method to instruction experienced the greatest levels of burnout. Recommendations generated within the study include the completion of a longitudinal study of teacher burnout and variables that influence burnout be completed to fully realize the significance of the impact of inclusion education on teacher burnout. Administrators must find was to provide the support needed for the successful implementation of inclusion education. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Special|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

Tonya Lyn Stephan Cunningham, "The impact of inclusion on teacher burnout" (2003). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3116145.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3116145

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