Factors predicting transient and persistent depression in a community sample of middle-age African -American women

Christina M Mentes, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to examine the predictors of persistent, transient, and resiliency to depression in African American middle-age women. The data was obtained from a database at the Center for Health Research at Tennessee State University. The database includes data from 427 unidentified African American women who were 35 to 64 years of age. A longitudinal analysis was conducted on data that was collected over a six to nine month period. The study utilized three binomial regressions to explore three hypotheses to determine which variables predicted resiliency to depression, transient depression and persistent depression. The results indicated that a higher internal locus of control predicted transient versus persistent depression. Participants with transient depression also demonstrated lower internal locus of control, lower life satisfaction, poorer reported health, and a more self-directing religious coping style that the participants who were more resilient to depression. Finally, those participants who demonstrated more resiliency to depression exhibited higher internal locus of control, higher church attendance, higher socio-economic status, more perceived social support and a less self-directing religious coping style than participants with persistent depression. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Women's Studies|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Christina M Mentes, "Factors predicting transient and persistent depression in a community sample of middle-age African -American women" (2003). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3107461.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3107461

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