The effects of self-efficacy for coping, constructed meaning, and spirituality on the quality of life in men with prostate cancer

Jeffery Paul Henderson, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Seventy-one men who had been diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer provided survey data as to factors potentially affecting their quality of life (QOL). Using stepwise multiple regression, measures of constructed meaning and self-efficacy for coping were demonstrated to account for 66.2% of the variance in a QOL measure, which included a prostate-specific scale. While the measures of constructed meaning and spirituality were shown to provide unique information, spirituality did not contribute to the regression model. Significant positive correlations were demonstrated between the self-efficacy for coping subscale, maintenance of activity and independence, and the QOL subscales of physical and functional well-being. Significant positive correlations also were observed between the measure of constructed meaning and the QOL subscales of emotional and functional well-being. Constructed meaning was significantly and positively associated with better QOL with regard to prostate-specific concerns. Multiple comparisons between groups following a nonparametric analysis demonstrated a significant difference between African American and Caucasian men on a measure of spiritual beliefs. Overall, results of the study suggest that psychosocial treatments for men with prostate cancer should include the exploration of meaning in the illness, and the promotion of self-efficacy for coping with the disease and the impact of treatment. ^

Subject Area

Religion, General|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Jeffery Paul Henderson, "The effects of self-efficacy for coping, constructed meaning, and spirituality on the quality of life in men with prostate cancer" (2002). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3061776.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3061776

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