An historical study on the effects of case Brown v. Board of Education in Nashville, Tennessee in 2001

Jessie Daniel McDonald, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to collect and present documentation to show the effect of the Supreme Court decision in case Brown v. Board of Education, which caused the racial integration era to begin and to grant equal civil rights to African Americans in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2001. This study was directed to show data on the number of African Americans that have administrative positions in the local city government and in the public school system, higher than a principal position in the year of 2001. ^ The literature collected from the Metropolitan Human Resource Office was intended to show the complete breakdown in the various departments of the Metropolitan Government. Each department in the Metropolitan Government was required by the Equal Employment Opportunity Office to show the various cultures that were represented in the employment positions, as well as showing the number of individuals employed and their positions of employment for the year of 2001. This study was limited to the number of African Americans that were employed in administrative positions of department heads or decision-making positions. Unfortunately, this data is not correct, due to errors in addition. ^ The literature from the Metropolitan Board of Education showed the various cultures that were represented in employment throughout the Metropolitan school districts, and their positions of employment. This study was limited to the number of African Americans that were employed in administrative positions above the employment position of principal. ^ Subjects in this study were citizens of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee, that was included in existing data from previous reports to the Office of Equal Employment of Opportunity Commission. The law and public policy for the Metropolitan Government in Nashville require all of its employees to be residents of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee, and to be a registered voter in Davidson County. The Davidson County Election Commission provided a count for the number of registered voters in Nashville and Davidson County for the year of 2001. ^

Subject Area

History, Black|Education, History of|Sociology, Social Structure and Development

Recommended Citation

Jessie Daniel McDonald, "An historical study on the effects of case Brown v. Board of Education in Nashville, Tennessee in 2001" (2002). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3061763.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3061763

Share

COinS