A comparison of enacted curriculums and the official curriculum in Catholic schools in the Diocese of Nashville

Margaret H Levins, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Although there is a plethora of material available that discusses curriculum theory and curriculum planning, there has been little empirical data that compared an official curriculum with the curriculum that is taught in the classroom. This study examined the match between an Official Curriculum Guide and the curriculum that is taught in classrooms in 15 elementary schools in the Diocese of Nashville. In order to determine that socioeconomic status was not a variable that impacted student achievement, this study also examined the income level averages and parental educational attainment level averages in each school. Using an alpha of .05 an ANOVA showed no significance between schools' average Income levels and academic achievement. Results indicated that Math scores were significantly impacted by parental attainment of an Associates degree. Using an alpha of .05, an ANOVA showed no significance between the number of objectives taught and academic achievement as measured with The Iowa Tests of Basic Skills. Future studies might include an examination of differences in Catholic schools that might impact achievement. In addition, this study might be replicated in other Diocese across the nation to determine if results are unique to this Diocese. ^

Subject Area

Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Margaret H Levins, "A comparison of enacted curriculums and the official curriculum in Catholic schools in the Diocese of Nashville" (2002). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3061762.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3061762

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