An historical perspective of the American Missionary Association and its establishment of LeMoyne College, 1871 to 1940

Valencia Bouncer Price, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the history of LeMoyne College, a 128-year-old, historically Black College, as a pioneer institution of the newly freed slaves in Tennessee following the Civil War. This study focused on the emergence of LeMoyne College and investigated the contributions of the institution to the cause of education and the difficult obstacles the college has had to endure since its founding. The study disclosed the effect of the college's programs of study on the lives of the students and it analyzed the role of two principals and two presidents who led the college during 69 years in its history. It addressed the origins and the significant developmental factors in the school's history, the societal changes that affected LeMoyne, and the school's unique role in educating Blacks in Tennessee. This research connected the history of the institution from 1871 to 1940 from the time of its founding through the tenure of the last White president. In the more than one hundred years since the founding of Black institutions of higher education in America, few studies have been devoted to the Black colleges. This study should raise the interest in black higher education on the part of students of American higher education. LeMoyne College played a significant part in early higher education reform. For a complete history of American higher education, the story of Black colleges must be told as well. ^

Subject Area

History, Black|Education, History of|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Valencia Bouncer Price, "An historical perspective of the American Missionary Association and its establishment of LeMoyne College, 1871 to 1940" (2001). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3024631.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3024631

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