Computer -aided instruction compared to a traditional method of teaching fractions in elementary mathematics

Rosemary McClung Hodges, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare student achievement in mathematics on the concept of fractions. The students in the two groups were from an urban area. The research question that guided the study, theorized that students using computer-aided-instruction and the traditional method would not demonstrate significant differences in math achievement. The identified objectives that addressed the research question were the following: (a) to determine, by use of paired t-test, whether or not each of the two teaching methods significantly affect math scores; (b) to directly compare the computer-aided-instruction to traditional instruction and compare the results on the concept of fractions; (c) to compare male/female results within each teaching method on the concept of fractions; and (d) to compare African American males/white males results within each teaching method on the concept of fractions. The researcher gathered data and analyzed student achievement by administering the California Achievement Test to the two groups as a pre and post assessment. StatView by SAS Institute, Inc. was used to analyze data for this study. Unpaired t-analysis and Mancova were used to generate the comparative data. The major findings of this study were as follows: (a) The results of the study revealed that no significant difference was found in achievement between the two groups or between the group means; (b) When directly comparing computer-aided-instruction to traditional instruction when teaching fractions, no significant difference was found between the two teaching methods or between the group means; (c) In comparison of male/female results within each teaching method on the concept of fractions, no significant difference was found in the pre or posttest; and (d) There was a significant difference between African-American males and white males in the experimental group with fraction gains, but no significant difference found in the control group. No significant difference was found in the pretest of fractions in either group. A significant difference was determined in the posttest of the control group and no significant difference was found within the experimental group. ^

Subject Area

Education, Mathematics|Education, Elementary|Education, Technology of|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Rosemary McClung Hodges, "Computer -aided instruction compared to a traditional method of teaching fractions in elementary mathematics" (2001). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3024622.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3024622

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