Perceived leadership effectiveness of male and female directors of schools in West and East Tennessee

Margarett M Bess, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study investigated the leadership effectiveness of female directors of schools compared to male directors of schools as perceived by principals in West and East Tennessee. The study was a constructive replication of the research conducted by Dr. Susan Gore of female and male directors in Middle Tennessee in 2000. An abbreviated version of the Diagnostic Survey of Leadership Improvement, consisting of ten items, was used to measure principals perceived satisfaction with selected leadership behaviors. The study sought to determine if statistically significant differences existed in the perceptions of leadership effectiveness when comparing male directors of schools to female directors of schools as reported by male principals, by female principals, and by the total group. The study also sought to determine if statistically significant differences existed in principals' perception of leadership effectiveness based on whether the school was considered rural or urban. Analysis of the data revealed no statistically significant differences in perceptions of leadership effectiveness when comparing male and female directors of schools as reported by male and female principals. ^

Subject Area

Women's Studies|Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Margarett M Bess, "Perceived leadership effectiveness of male and female directors of schools in West and East Tennessee" (2001). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3024614.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3024614

Share

COinS