A comparison of geriatric depression and activity level between residents of a retirement community and participants of a senior citizens center

Larry Fletcher Palmer, Tennessee State University

Abstract

Depressive symptomatology has been reported to be most prevalent among those over age 65 while activity tends to decrease with age. This study examined the correlations between depression and activity among 46 (13 men, 33 women) independent living retired adults and 46 (12 men, 34 women) participants at a local Senior Citizens Center. Correlations were obtained using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS; Yesavage & Brink, 1983) and a listing of monthly opportunities for activity. Pearson product moment correlations were obtained for both groups. It was hypothesized that among residents of the retirement home, there would be a negative correlation between the GDS and activity level while among participants of the Senior Citizens Center, there would be no relation between the GDS and activity level. It was further hypothesized that the results would support past findings that the increased prevalence of depression in older adults on self-report depression scales are related to decreased participation in group activities. Even for persons in relatively good health, growing older heightens awareness of the imminence of frailty and a desire for less activity. This study suggests the need to prevent social isolation and loneliness among the elderly by encouraging them to remain active. ^

Subject Area

Gerontology|Psychology, Social|Psychology, Clinical|Psychology, Cognitive

Recommended Citation

Larry Fletcher Palmer, "A comparison of geriatric depression and activity level between residents of a retirement community and participants of a senior citizens center" (2000). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3007618.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3007618

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